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Monday, August 10, 2009

Oh, The Delicious Irony

Honestly, it isn't fair for blacks to refer to a man like Kenneth Gladney as an "Uncle Tom" because he is black and takes up conservative ideals, as that label is predicated on many factors that they may not realize at first glimps. Maybe he honestly ( and foolishly ) believes in them. But, what can be found out later will allow all of us to formulate a more concise, more accurate, opinion of a man ( or woman ) and how they are using the tactics fed to them, even if it is against their own self-interest.

The Washington Monthly reports:

Yesterday, about 200 conservative activists held a protest outside the SEIU office in St. Louis. Gladney was there -- bandaged and in a wheelchair -- as a featured guest. Some of the activists held signs that read, "Don't Tread on Kenny." Reader R.D. alerted me to this tidbit in the local news account of the protest:

Gladney did not address Saturday's crowd of about 200 people. His attorney, David Brown, however, read a prepared statement Gladney wrote. "A few nights ago there was an assault on my liberty, and on yours, too." Brown read. "This should never happen in this country."

Supporters cheered. Brown finished by telling the crowd that Gladney is accepting donations toward his medical expenses. Gladney told reporters he was recently laid off and has no health insurance.

Wait, the conservative opponent of health care reform, fighting (literally) to defeat a plan that would bring coverage to those who lose their jobs, lost his coverage because he got laid off?


The sad part of this is that he will have his medical bills taken care of by conservatives solely because he towed the line. Not because he is honest, not because he has something to contribute to the ongoing debate over healthcare, but simply because he is the gimmick of the moment for conservatives.

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